1969 Dodge Charger SE R/T – Candy Colored, Thrice-Built, & A Tribute To A True Craftsman!

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Classic and resto-modded Mopars are influenced above the Ma Mopar`s engineering and decorating teams. We are here to discuss the 1969 SE R/T Dodge Charger of Mr. Robert Frost which was influenced strongly by Sam Molina. He got him thinking outside the box.

Robert and Sam met somewhere in the eighties. On a sale, he discovered an old-school a 1969 Charger SE R/T 440/four-speed. He cashed five hundred and purchased it, drove it Denver in the workshop of MoPower Masters. Tony Richard, the owner of the shop acquinted Robert with Sam, the painter of MoPower, which was infamous for its old-school painting methods.




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Mr. Frost intended  to use a shade from the early seventies, famous as the High Impact red. He also planned to feature all white within the interior and to add an awesome white vinyl top.  As Robert said Sam had a one of a kind idea to take it on a whole new level.

Joe Bailon,  a world famous painter from Californa intended to use the palette from Candy colors adding a gold  or silver on the under base.

The coast used after applying the silver under base was derived from the House of Kolor`s Candy Apple Red. He featured another twenty-five layer of sprayed color.

Robert finished his baby in 1983, and then took it to a crusade around the city of Denver, and several years later, he took it on it very first car show. The show took place in Bandimere Speedway, which is a Mopar-dedicated event. The Charger took first place as best in class.

Drag racing really got a hold on Robert. From that moment on, the car was a show/race car.

Carrying the “Poetic Justice”name, the Charger rode in the middle fifteen seconds.

Unluckily, while driving on DOT race tires, a terrible rain poured out all of a sudden, on I-25 rod resulted into a spin that put the Charger right into the concrete median of the freeway, doing a terrible damage. Then, Robert had to do the 1969 restoration, doing a replacement above the framerails in the rear body. The shop of Tom Hammack then did the underhood sculpting and the rear body laser straightening.

John May , a famous custom painter from Denver redid the Candy Apple Red shade, and Marshall Canafax was in charged for what was happening under the body.